Curriculum

At Atara Girls High school, we aim to produce young women who have a sophisticated grasp and appreciation of both Jewish and secular topics, and who will engage in a lifelong pursuit of learning and development. We provide a well-rounded and wholistic education.

Our academic goals for each student are to increase the depth and scope of her knowledge in both Judaic and General Studies, refine her critical thinking abilities and learning skills, and to foster a lifelong love of learning within her.2013-11-18 11.56.40

Ultimately, our goal is for each Atara graduate to be steeped in the knowledge of Torah, knowledgeable in the Arts and Sciences, and possessing the skills necessary to flourish and find success in all areas of her life.

We have developed a rigorous curriculum with dynamic, fast-moving courses that reflects those goals. The school has a dual education program in Judaic and college preparatory studies. The Judaic studies curriculum aims to foster a deep and lifelong appreciation of Jewish learning, philosophy, and laws while building a wide knowledge base and textual skills. The General Studies curriculum is designed to develop a broad knowledge in the humanities and sciences, and to prepare students to take full advantage of higher education opportunities.

The deeply committed and intellectually proficient Torah Jew elevates all of Hashem’s creation to morality, spirituality, and holiness. Over four years, we hope to give each of our students the gift of a comprehensive Jewish education and the tools for a meaningful relationship with her Creator.

 

JUDAIC STUDIES

The extensive reach of our Judaic Curriculum has been developed with deeper mission in mind. With the Torah each student learns, we wish to instill within her a love and reverence of G-d and Judiasm that will stand at the core of her developing adult identity. Our students are the next generation of Jewish women, and the continuity of the Jewish people rests in their hands. It is not enough for them to master the comprehensive curriculum; it must be incorporated into the very lives and essence of every student.2013-11-18 11.38.52

Torah is internalized through study and dedication. All students take between three and four years of Chumash (Be’iyun and Bekius), studying texts in both the original Hebrew and in translation. Our Chumash courses are designed to develop the students’ textual skills, with the goal of enabling the students to read and comprehend the text of Tanach and its commentaries with ease. We work to achieve a depth of understanding of the text that allows the students to use the text as a springboard for evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of ideas. Our Chumash Bekiyus classes give the girls a sense of the scope and major philosophical themes of each sefer.

Both our Chumash Be’iyun classes and our Ivrit Classes are tracked to allow for the homogeneity that assists in rapid skill development.

Equally important are classes that are rich in Torah life approach, Jewish philosophy, and Torah thought. It is crucial to us that students are given a powerful hashkafic grounding so they can begin their adult lives well-informed, well-educated, and confident in their beliefs.

The four years of Navi are taught through a Mussar paradigm, where relevant life lessons are culled from the text and storyline.  We require four years of Halacha, with a focus on the laws necessary for Jewish living and running a Jewish home. We also offer three years of Ivrit classes to learn how to speak, write and understand Modern Hebrew. Our curriculum is rounded out with classes in Tefillah, Parsha, Yahadus, and Jewish Philosophy.

GENERAL STUDIES 

Following the motto of excellence, Atara has designed an excellent college preparatory General Studies program, with a wide variety of course work and an extensive familiarity with the tools  and skills that are needed to be successful in the modern world. 2014-01-09 14.13.07Each student is provided with a strong educational base, with which she can go on to attend university and pursue the career of her choice. Our curriculum is thorough and engaging enough to 2013-10-30 15.46.54challenge the advanced student, and at the same time is accommodating and flexible to cater to a variety of scholastic levels.

 

JUDAIC STUDIES

ספר במדבר: The Book of Numbers – Track A

TEXTS:

  • Sefer Bamidbar – Hebrew with commentaries for classroom use.
  • Sefer Bamidbar – Metzudah for out of class use.
  • Supplements are provided by teacher containing Midrashim, Acharonim, Gemara, and Halacha that are pertinent to subject matter.

Course Description:

This Bible study course is track based to allow for appropriate and focused skill development. It allows for an in depth study of the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers. Emphasis is on mastery of content, focusing mainly on the text, Rashi, and a sampling of early and later commentaries. Textual skills begin to be developed through a variety of learning strategies.

Course Objectives:

      • Gain a command of loshon hakodesh and a profound appreciation of G-d’s Torah and our classic interpreters of the texts.
      • Learn middos development and moral and ethical standards as portrayed in the lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and other Biblical personalities.
      • Use the text as a spark to explore the philosophical concepts contained therein and expand the scope and depth of their understanding of תורה השקפה.
      • Become comfortable and self-sufficient reading Biblical text, including the ability to:
              • develop reading fluency and speed in both print and rashi script.
              • expand their vocabulary and understanding of Biblical Hebrew
              • comprehend root words and be able to recognize and translate different conjugations of root words.
              • break down and translate a פםוק.
              • develop proficiency reading commentaries including the ability to:
                      • identify the question, answer, and supporting evidence from within a commentary.
                      • bridge the commentary back into the text to enhance understanding.
                      • compare and contrast different commentaries

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Bamidbar

  • Uniqueness of Shevet Levi
  • Moshe’s talmidim
  • Numbering the Sons of Levi
  • Bad Neighbors/Good Neighbors

 

Unit 2: Naso

  • Sotah
  • Birkas Kohanim

 

Unit 3: Behaaloscha

  • Chovav and the Aron’s Travels
  • The Complainers
  • Kivros Hata’ava
  • Loshon Hora about Moshe

 

Unit 4: Korach

  • The uprising and Related Topics

 

Unit 5: Chukas

  • Miriam;s Death and Mai Meriva
  • Aharon’s Death
  • Copper Snake

 

Unit 6: Balak

  • Bilam and Balak
  • Sin in Shitim

Assessments

  • Students will be tested with a written assessment approximately twice a month on the content they have learned.
  • Students will be quizzed daily with translation review assessments
  • Students will have oral midterm and final. It will be a skill based review of key commentaries learned throughout the semester.

JUDAIC STUDIES

ספר במדבר: The Book of Numbers – Track B

TEXTS:

  • Sefer Bamidbar – Hebrew with commentaries for classroom use.
  • Sefer Bamidbar – Metzudah for out of class use.
  • Suppliments are provided by teacher containing Midrashim, Acharonim, Gemara, and Halacha that are pertinent to subject matter.

Course Description:

This Bible study course is track based to allow for appropriate and focused skill development. It allows for an in depth study of the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers. Emphasis is on mastery of content, focusing mainly on the text, Rashi, and a sampling of early and later commentaries, but depth of analysis is increased. This level delves into more interpretations of text and Rashi than Track A, and there is an expectation of mastery appropriate for a level 2 course. Goals are advanced proficiency in all commentaries to prepare students for intensive seminary studies.

Course Objectives:

  • Gain a command of loshon hakodesh and a profound appreciation of G-d’s Torah and our classic interpreters of the texts.
  • Learn middos development and moral and ethical standards as portrayed in the lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and other Biblical personalities.
  • Use the text as a spark to explore the philosophical concepts contained therein and expand the scope and depth of their understanding of תורה השקפה.
  • Become comfortable and self-sufficient reading Biblical text, including the ability to:
    • develop reading fluency and speed in both print and rashi script.
    • expand their vocabulary and understanding of Biblical Hebrew
    • comprehend root words and be able to recognize and translate different conjugations of root words.
    • break down and translate a פםוק.
    • develop proficiency reading commentaries including the ability to:
      • identify the question, answer, and supporting evidence from within a commentary.
      • bridge the commentary back into the text to enhance understanding.
      • compare and contrast different commentaries

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Bamidbar

  • Uniqueness of Shevet Levi
  • Moshe’s talmidim
  • Numbering the Sons of Levi
  • Bad Neighbors/Good Neighbors

 

Unit 2: Naso

  • Sotah
  • Birkas Kohanim

 

Unit 3: Behaaloscha

  • Chovav and the Aron’s Travels
  • The Complainers
  • Kivros Hata’ava
  • Loshon Hora about Moshe

 

Unit 4: Korach

  • The uprising and Related Topics

 

Unit 5: Chukas

  • Miriam;s Death and Mai Meriva
  • Aharon’s Death
  • Copper Snake

 

Unit 6: Balak

  • Bilam and Balak
  • Sin in Shitim

Assessments

  • Students will be tested with a written assessment approximately twice a month on the content they have learned.
  • Students will be quizzed daily with translation review assessments
  • Students will have oral midterm and final. It will be a skill based review of key commentaries learned throughout the semester.

JUDAIC STUDIES

ספר במדבר: The Book of Numbers – Track C – Honors

TEXTS:

  • Sefer Bamidbar – Hebrew with commentaries for classroom use.
  • Sefer Bamidbar – Metzudah for out of class use.
  • Suppliments are provided by teacher containing Midrashim, Acharonim, Gemara, and Halacha that are pertinent to subject matter.

Course Description:

This Bible study course is track based to allow for appropriate and focused skill development. It allows for an in depth study of the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers. This is the most advanced Chumash class offered at Atara. Students are exposed to complex insights, interpretations, references to passages in both written and oral Torah, and a wide range of early and later commentaries. The goals are profound comprehension of the philosophy and message of the sections of Bamidbar plus proficiency in texts and commentators. Students are prepared for the most prestigious of seminaries in the United States and abroad.

Course Objectives:

  • Gain a command of loshon hakodesh and a profound appreciation of G-d’s Torah and our classic interpreters of the texts.
  • Learn middos development and moral and ethical standards as portrayed in the lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and other Biblical personalities.
  • Use the text as a spark to explore the philosophical concepts contained therein and expand the scope and depth of their understanding of תורה השקפה.
  • Become comfortable and self-sufficient reading Biblical text, including the ability to:
    • develop reading fluency and speed in both print and rashi script.
    • expand their vocabulary and understanding of Biblical Hebrew
    • comprehend root words and be able to recognize and translate different conjugations of root words.
    • break down and translate a פםוק.
    • develop proficiency reading commentaries including the ability to:
      • identify the question, answer, and supporting evidence from within a commentary.
      • bridge the commentary back into the text to enhance understanding.
      • compare and contrast different commentaries

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Bamidbar

  • Uniqueness of Shevet Levi
  • Moshe’s talmidim
  • Numbering the Sons of Levi
  • Bad Neighbors/Good Neighbors

 

Unit 2: Naso

  • Sotah
  • Birkas Kohanim

 

Unit 3: Behaaloscha

  • Chovav and the Aron’s Travels
  • The Complainers
  • Kivros Hata’ava
  • Loshon Hora about Moshe

 

Unit 4: Korach

  • The uprising and Related Topics

 

Unit 5: Chukas

  • Miriam;s Death and Mai Meriva
  • Aharon’s Death
  • Copper Snake

 

Unit 6: Balak

  • Bilam and Balak
  • Sin in Shitim

Assessments

  • Students will be tested with a written assessment approximately twice a month on the content they have learned.
  • Students will be quizzed daily with translation review assessments
  • Students will have oral midterm and final. It will be a skill based review of key commentaries learned throughout the semester.

JUDAIC STUDIES

HEBREW LANGUAGE I

 Course Description

The focus of the Hebrew Language sequence is to stress the dual components of grammar and literature. This course concentrates on the development of a working vocabulary in conversational Hebrew. The verb and its conjugation, sentence development and composition are all stressed. Extensive reading and writing both in and out of class are necessary components of this course. Complex verb forms are stressed in grammar. Conversational Hebrew and Israeli publications are utilized throughout the program. This sequence promotes a love for the Hebrew language and to impart skills in conversation, reading and writing. Each succeeding course is designed to build upon the students’ previous knowledge.

Course Objectives

Students who completed this level will be able to:

Speak:

  • in dialogues about school, family, entertainment, personal preference, the weather, or place description – 15 sentences per speaker
  • in an interview: ask questions, answer, report – 15 sentences per speaker
  • express an opinion and support the opinion with reasons – 5-6 sentences

Write:

  • short notes (greeting, apology, thanks, invitation)
  • a personal letter -15 sentences
  • an impersonal letter (announcement, request, report) -10 sentences

Read and comprehend:

  • an informative paragraph -15-20 sentences
  • an opinion supported by reasons
  • a short story – 15-30 sentences
  • a simple poem, or a few biblical verses

Listen to and understand:

  • a short dialogue about daily life – up to 24 sentences
  • a simple song
  • a short informative lecture about modern life, tradition and habits

Recognize and use the following structures: 

  1. Morphology:
    • Past tense of the following verb patterns: pa’al, pi’el, hiph’il, hitpa’el (shlemim);(in pa’al)
    • Declension of the prepositions et, im, shel
    • Prefixes and suffixes of the future tense
    • Recognition of regular verbs (shlemim) in all seven verb patterns (binyanim)
  2. Syntax:
    • Agreement of nouns and adjectives in number and gender and agreement using the definite article
    • Three forms of nominal clauses in all three tenses
    • Impersonal verbal clauses
    • Impersonal nominal clauses
    • Two kinds of object clauses: with the conjunction sh’ and with interrogative adverbs
    • Modals
    • Identifying parts of speech and word order

Scope and Sequence

The following vocabulary units will be taught and integrated into the above course objectives:

Unit 1: Household

Unit 2: School

Unit 3: Grocery

Unit 4: Clothing/Shopping

 Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Frequent nightly readings and written assignments

  • One large project per unit

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.

  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

  • Oral discussion labs once per week

Midterm or final: 30%

 

 

JUDAIC STUDIES

HEBREW LANGUAGE II

 Course Description:

The focus of the Hebrew Language sequence is to stress the dual components of grammar and literature. This course concentrates on the development of a working vocabulary in conversational Hebrew. The verb and its conjugation, sentence development, and composition are all stressed. Extensive reading and writing both in and out of class are necessary components of this course. Complex verb forms are stressed in grammar. Conversational Hebrew and Israeli publications are utilized throughout the program. This sequence promotes a love for the Hebrew language and to impart skills in conversation, reading and writing. Each succeeding course is designed to build upon the students’ previous knowledge.

Course Objectives

Students who completed this level will be able to:

Speak:

  • in conversation on any topic – 20 sentences per speaker

Read: 

  • press releases and articles in journalistic style in elementary Hebrew of 30-35 sentences
  • a short story partially adapted to elementary Hebrew of 70 – 100 sentences
  • poetry, midrashim, or biblical verses, with  general comprehension, based on key words, syntactic structures, and morphology

Write:

  • creating tables from text
  • a personal or historic chronological report ~ 15 sentences
  • a theoretical analysis of reasons, results, and purposes of ~ 2- sentences

Listen to and understand:

  • simple TV or radio news (general understanding)
  • a dialogue in standard Hebrew with ~ 25 sentences per speaker
  • the main ideas of a  simple song based on a single hearing

Recognize and use the following structures: 

  1. Morphology:
    • Normal formation of gerunds in the active conjugations and in the common paradigms: several irregular formations of gerunds
    • Future tense in the conjugations pa’al, pi’el, hiph’il, hipa’el (shlemim); (in pa’al)
    • Common paradigms in the active conjugations
    • Declension of all prepositions with plural noun suffixes (el, al)
    • Declension of all prepositions with singular noun suffixes (etzel, bishvil, l’yad)
    • Declension of prepositins with irregular suffixes (beyn, m’)
    • Past participles of pa’al (shlemim and)
    • Common Hebrew suffixes and patterns of non-Hebrew words
    • The possessive
  2. Syntax:
    • Placement of construct-states (smichut) in sentences
    • Placement of gerunds in sentences
    • Formation of expressions and clauses of cause, time, purpose, result, comparison, contrast, concession
    • Actual conditional clauses
    • Copulas

Scope and Sequence

The following vocabulary units will be taught and integrated into the above course objectives:

Unit 1: Review of concepts covered in Hebrew Language I

Unit 2: Restaurant and food preparation

Unit 3: Shabbos and Holidays

Unit 4: Bank, money, and financial terminology

 Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Frequent nightly readings and written assignments

  • One large project per unit

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.

  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

  • Oral discussion labs once per week

Midterm or final: 30%

JUDAIC STUDIES

The Weekly Parsha

Course Description:

This class will feature an overview of each week’s Torah portion. The overview will present the themes and major points as they are divided by the seven Aliyos. Additionally, specific insights will be discussed, with a focus on ideas that lend themselves to practical application in the day to day lives of the students

Course Objectives:

Students will become familiar with the general content of each week’s Torah portion and acquire insights that will add meaning ot these ideas. Together, they will help the students develop an appreciation and feel for the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah and its connection to the flow of the Jewish year and our daily lives. Students will come to class knowing the number of verses and mitzohs in the current week’s portion as well as the date in the Hebrew Calendar.

 

Assessments:

There will be a weekly quiz on the previous week’s class and a general review and test each quarter.

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Devarim

  • Week 1 – Ha’azinu
  • Week 2 – Vizos HaBracha

 

Unit 2: Braishis

  • Braishis
  • Noach
  • Lech Licha
  • Vayeira
  • Chayei Sara
  • Toldos
  • Vayetzei
  • Vayishlach
  • Vayeishev
  • Mikaitz
  • Vayigash
  • Vayechi

 

Unit 3: Shemos

  • Shemos
  • Vaera
  • Bo
  • Beshalach
  • Yisro
  • Mispatim
  • Teruma
  • Tetzaveh
  • Ki Sisa
  • Vayakhel
  • Pikudei

 

Unit 4: Vayikra

  • Vayikra
  • Tzav
  • Shemini
  • Tazriah
  • Metzorah
  • Acharei Mos
  • Kedoshim
  • Emor
  • Behar
  • Bechukosai

 

Unit 5: Bamidbar

  • Bemidbar
  • Naso
  • Behaloscha
  • Selach

JUDAIC STUDIES

Judaic Art

Course Description

This Judaic Art course is an opportunity for students to work with many different media. The topics covered include instruction in the fundamentals of painting, drawing, and calligraphy. Each student’s creativity and expression are encouraged in a supportive and confidence boosting environment. The goal of the course is to teach the traditional principles of art within a Judaic art framework. The curriculum is focused on the use of color, proportion, technique, and imagery to create works of art that have emotional undertones. Thoughts and ideas are represented through illustration and design.

Course Objectives

Students should be able to:

  • select and use art media, subject matter, and symbols for expression and communication;

  • know the elements of art and the principles of design and how they are used in the visual arts;

  • solve visual arts problems with originality, flexibility, fluency, and imagination;

  • use materials, methods, information, and technology in a safe and ethical manner;

  • perceive, reflect upon, and evaluate the characteristics, purposes, and merits of their work and the work of others;

  • identify, analyze, and apply criteria for making visual aesthetic judgments;

  • understand and execute a project that allows them to take an emotional or non-tangible idea and bring it to a visual form;

  • learn to self-critique and peer-critique art in a supportive environment;

  • learn to accept challenges, discover new art concepts and allow themselves to be stretched beyond their natural comfort zone;

  • appreciate the reality that to get more impressive and creative results, trial and error and patience are essential components;

  • understand the importance of negative and positive space within a design and be able to use and adjust their ideas accordingly;

  • learn about proper layout and correct margins within a design;

  • understand theory related to using color;

  • understand how to use the color wheel to complement their art as well as convey depth and distance based on shade and tints;

 

Scope and Sequence

  1. Micrography- learn the techniques of micrography art and be able to manipulate this art form to create texture and depth within their drawings

    1. What is it?

    2. How is it done?

      1. Rose tutorial

    3. What potential does it have?

      1. “hi” visual

      2. Negative/positive space

      3. Leaf drawings filled

  2. Creating a design

    1. What is your message

    2. What is implied

    3. What is important

      1. Create brainstormed word list

        1. Translation

        2. Association

  3. Harry Chaplin – Flowers Are Red

    1. Realistic vs. imaginary

    2. No limitations

  4. Art Psychology: Beyond Three

    1. More difficult

    2. More creative thinking process

    3. Create 4 sketches

      1. Sketch vs. drawing

  5. Choose your design

    1. Create 4 representations in sketch form

    2. Draw realistic elements

    3. Copy and paste four full size options

      1. Hang on wall

      2. Compare from distance and combine best aspects into final layout

  6. Layout

    1. Standard size/economic options for framing

    2. Building size to include proper margins

      1. Understanding the eye needs space

      2. Where to create spaces

  7. Parts of one whole

    1. Create each image independently

    2. Experiment with fill vs. no fill

    3. Create natural texture

    4. Mix and match variations

      1. Create master template

      2. Use guide underneath

      3. Use reference

  8. Micrography Tips

    1. Cut out/ guide for following

    2. Size matters

    3. Extensions and spacing

  9. Color!

    1. Pastel color wheel

    2. Pastel techniques

      1. Hand/tissue/towel

      2. Broad, tip, corner

      3. Radial

  10. Calligraphy

    1. Use of traditional ink and nibs to create calligraphic Hebrew letters and designs

    2. Fundamentals of ink properties, proper care pressure, and cleaning procedure

    3. Basics of one Hebrew font

    4. How to align letters within texts

    5. Adjust kerning and leading within hand formed letters

    6. Some “safris” rules and guidelines

    7. “point counting” between words and lines to create personalized artwork

 

Projects

Project 1:

Students will learn to create proper blocked text in a standard size and color

Project 2:

Students will learn to arch and stretch letters within circular designs

Students will learn to blend color and pattern within their letters and designs

Students will learn to use ink and color for illumination

Project 3:

Students will create a final piece of artwork that incorporates all of their skills. This project will be the culmination of all elements learned throughout the year. Students will be asked to select one paragraph and illuminate using any or all components of micrography and calligraphy, via size and color effects and  layout and design to create a personalized piece of Judaica art.

 

Judaic Studies

BEKIYUS-BAMIDBAR

Course Description

A Chumash Bikiyus course has been adopted by many of the preeminent girls high schools across the country as a complement to the Chumah Be’iyun course. This course offers the students a broader philosophical perspective, and provides the girls with a more expansive understanding of the timeline and chronology of the Chumash. The primary focus of the course is the key elements of the Book of Bamidbar. Several classes are dedicated to learning about Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur with each including enhanced appreciation of their precise positions on the Jewish calendar.

 

Course Objectives

  • Students will learn the major events, key personalities, and Ma’amarei Chazal from Bamidbar

  • Students will apply these significant lessons to their lives

  • Students will recognize the relevance of each book to their generation and recognize the eternal message of the sefer

  • Students will know key Ma’amarei Chazal

  • Students must review notes consistently

 

Scope and Sequence

Unit 1- Names of the Sefer and the meanings and messages of each name

  • Bamidbar

  • Chumash Hapikudim

Unit 2-

  • Counting Shevet Levi

  • Degalim

  • Nazir

Unit 3-

  • Birchas Kohanim

  • Pesach Sheini

  • Yisro- the rest of the story

Unit 4-

  • Miriam’s complaint against Moshe

  • Misonenim

  • Korach

Unit 5-

  • Moshe’s “failure”

  • Bilaam

  • Pinchas

Unit 6-

  • Kashering

  • Tevilas Keilim

  • Bnos Tzelafchad

  • Ir Miklat

Unit 7-

  • Authenticity of the Torah record

  • Brochoh

  • Prophecy

Unit 8-

  • Authority of Leadership

  • Humanity of Leadership

  • Land of Israel

  • Zealotry

Included in what is addressed while analyzing each theme will be:

  • Timing

  • Context

  • Characters and their backgrounds

  • Impact on the characters

  • Impact on the “klal”

  • Impact on our destiny

 

Assessments

Students will be assessed through a combination of factors

  • Class participation

  • Frequent quizzes

  • Projects

  • Homework assignments

  • Quarterly Tests

Judaic Studies

 

Jewish Philosophy

 

Text:

Orchos Tzaddikim, The Ways of the Righteous

 

Course Description:

Jewish Philosophy class meets once per week. Its main purpose is to awaken an awareness of self-improvement in students, and to instill a striving within each student to work on one’s middos, character traits. The sefer Orchos Tzaddikim, The Ways of the Righteous, is used as a tool to highlight certain character traits, while the rest will be summarized outside of the text. It is split into 28 chapters. Certain key paragraphs of each chapter will be read in the text. The students will take notes as well as discuss the various points. Each chapter focuses entirely on one middah.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To awaken an awareness of self-improvement in students

  • To instill a striving within each student to work on her middos

  • To serve as a forum in which each student will feel comfortable expressing herself and listening to her peers

  • To use the text as a springboard for many meaningful discussions in which many important religious ethics questions will be answered

Scope and Sequence:

  • Chapter 1:  Shaar HaGa’ava/ Haughtiness

  1. Good pride vs. bad pride

  2. Confidence vs. arrogance

  3. What ga’ava leads to

  4. How to uproot ga’ava

 

  • Chapter 2:  Shaar Ha’anava/Humbleness

  1. 7 ways to recognize a humble person

  2. A humble person’s relationship with Hashem

  3. What anava leads to

  4. People in Tanach who displayed anava

 

  • Chapter 3:  Shaar Habusha/Shame

  1. 4 levels of Busha in regard to sinning

  2. Feeling shame after sinning

  3. Abusing busha; embarrassing someone

  4. Good shame vs. bad shame

  • Chapter 4:  Shaar Ha’azus/Impudence

  1. What azus leads to

  2. How Hashem views & judges an “az panim”

  3. When to use azus for the good

 

  • Chapter 5:  Shaar Ha’ahava/Love

  1. Highest level in serving Hashem

  2. 6 types of corrupt love

  3. Mitzvah of Loving fellow Jew

  4. People in Tanach who displayed ahavas Hashem

  5. Shir HaShirim as a mashal

  • Chapter 6:  Shaar Ha’sinah/Hatred

  1. What sinah causes

  2. Sinas chinam: baseless hatred

  3. 2 types of sinah

  4. People in Tanach who displayed sinah

  5. Mitzvah to hate sheker/falsehood

 

Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Nightly reading will be given as homework.

  • Periodic written homework will be given as a review of material covered in class.

  • Writing assignments will be given quarterly.

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.

  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

 

Midterm or final: 30%

Pacing

The entire Sefer Orchos Tzadikim will be learned with the following timeline:

Sept- Oct: the first 4 chapters (Conceit, Humbleness, Shame, Impudence)

Nov- Dec: the next 6 chapters (Love, Hatred, Mercy, Cruelty, Happiness, Worry)

Jan: 3 chapters (Regret, Anger, Desire)

Feb-March: the next 7 chapters (Jealousy, Alacrity, Laziness, Generosity, Stinginess, Memory, Forgetting)

April –May: the next 6 chapters (Silence, Lies, Truth, Flattery, Slander, and Repentance)

June: the final 2 chapters (Torah, Fear of Heaven)

 

GENERAL STUDIES

Modern World History

Course Description:

Modern History surveys world events from the Renaissance to the present. The major
focus is on Western civilization. Political and cultural events associated with the
Renaissance, the rise of nation-states, war and diplomacy, changing economic
systems, and revolutions. The course will end with an in-depth study of World War I
and II. Historical fiction, biographies, films, and other audio-visual materials are part of
the classroom experience. A variety of approaches – chronological, thematic,
historiographic, and biographical – are possible.

Course Objectives:

Students will:

  • Read maps and predict the effects of geography on human cultures and societies
  • Use primary and secondary sources to construct valid answers to the essential
    questions
  • Defend premises and arguments with valid support from primary and secondary
    sources
  • Debate historical issues and interpretations using precise language and supporting
    evidence
  • Write persuasive paragraphs and papers with strong theses and support from primary
    and secondary sources
  • Develop and apply terms for analyzing religions, and social, political, and economic
    organizations
  • Comprehend and apply elements of art criticism to historical works of art
  • Prepare for and argue in debates or discussion
  • Apply refined historical skills (construction of written and oral arguments, use of valid
    primary and secondary sources to defend arguments, drawing valid inferences, use of
    precise language, analysis of maps, charts, and graphs)

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Renaissance and Reformation

  • Renaissance art
  • Renaissance humanism
  • Martin Luther and his ideas
  • Calvinism and Anglicanism
  • Propaganda in the Protestant Reformation
  • The Catholic Reformation and Counter Reformation

 

Unit 2: Early Modern Europe and the Old Regime

  • The Price Revolution and changes to daily life in early modern Europe
  • Social Hierarchy and daily life in early modern Europe
  • Early modern European women and witchcraft
  • English Constitutionalism- Elizabeth to William and Mary
  • Henry IV and Louis XIII
  • Louis XIV as a model of absolutism

 

Unit 3: The Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment

  • Galileo
  • Scientific method and discoveries
  • Isaac Newton- a scientific view of the universe
  • The Enlightenment- Locke, Rousseau, Voltaire

 

Unit 4: The French Revolution and Conservative Reaction

  • Enlightenment Ideas
  • Social and Economic Background to The French Revolution
  • The Summoning of the Estates General
  • The Role of Women and Working Classes
  • The Liberal Constitution of 1791
  • The Radical Phase and the Reign of Terror
  • Napoleon
  • The lasting effects of the French Revolution
  • The Congress of Vienna

 

Unit 5: The Industrial Revolution and Early Industrial Europe

  • From the cottage system to the Factory system
  • Factory Life
  • Worker responses to the Factory system
  • Social ranking – middle class and working class
  • The Growth of Industrial cities

 

Unit 6: Nationalism and Imperialism

  • Nationalism
  • The new Imperialism
  • Motives and Methods of European Imperialism
  • Reactions to European Imperialism

 

Unit 7: World War I

  • Long and short term causes of World War I
  • Political Geography of Europe in 1914
  • The Schlieffen Plan
  • Trench Warfare

 

GENERAL STUDIES

American Government

Course Description:

The American Government course focuses on the United States’ founding principles
and beliefs. Students will study the structure, functions, systems, powers of
government at the national, state, and local levels, and political processes. Content will
include factors that influence U.S. Government. This course prepares students to
become responsible/aware members of American society.

Course Objectives:

Students will:

  • understand major political ideas and forms of government in history.
  • understand how constitutional government, as developed in the United States, has
    been influenced by people, ideas, and historical documents.
  • understand the roles played by individuals, political parties, interest groups, and the
    media in the U.S. political system, past and present.
  • understand the American beliefs and principles reflected in the U.S. Constitution.
  • understand the structure and functions of the government created by the U.S.
    Constitution.
  • understand the processes for filling public offices in the U.S. system of government.
  • understand the role of political parties in the U.S. system of government.
  • understand the similarities and differences that exist among the U.S. system of
    government and other political systems.
  • understand rights guaranteed by the U.S. Constitution.
  • understand the importance of voluntary individual participation in the U.S. democratic
    society.
  • understand the importance of the expression of different points of view in a
    democratic society.

Scope and Sequence:

  • Introducing Government in America
  • The Constitution
  • Federalism
  • Civil Liberties and Public Policy
  • Civil Rights and Public Policy
  • Public Opinion and Political Action
  • Political Parties
  • Nominations and Campaigns
  • Elections and Voting Behavior
  • Interest Groups
  • Congress
  • The Presidency
  • The Congress, the President, and the Budget: Taxing and Spending
  • The Federal Bureaucracy
  • The Federal Courts
  • Economic Policymaking
  • Social Welfare Policymaking
  • Policymaking for Health Care and the Environment
  • National Security Policymaking
  • The New Face of State and Local Government
  • Introduction Government in Ohio
  • The Ohio Constitution
  • Political Parties, Campaigns, Elections, and Interest Groups in Ohio
  • The Ohio Legislature
  • The Governor and Bureaucracy of Ohio
  • The Texas Court System
  • Local Government

GENERAL STUDIES

US History

Course Description:

This course is a comprehensive study of the development of the United States
designed to provide students with the factual knowledge and analytical skills necessary
to deal critically with U.S. history and to introduce students to important issues in the
development of our constitutional democracy. This course provides a one-year survey
of American history from the Colonial Period and the American Revolution to the
present day, with an emphasis on the twentieth century. Students come to understand
the importance of geography in the historical process, the development of a
constitutional democracy, the social/cultural identity of a multi-national and multi-racial
people, the importance of science and technology in the development of an economy
based on both agriculture and industry, and the developing role of the U.S. as a world
power. Using the textbook and primary documents, students will develop skills
necessary to arrive at conclusions on the basis of informed judgment and to present
reasons and evidence clearly and persuasively orally and in writing.

Course Objectives:

  • Reading and Thinking Critically
  • Articulating and Defending Thoughts Logically In Oral and Written Form
  • Analyzing and Evaluting Primary and Secondary Sources
  • Determing Cause and Effect
  • Organizing and Ranking Information
  • Reading and Using Maps
  • Mastering factual material

 

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Colonial America

  • England and the New World
  • The Eighteenth Century
  • The Colonial Crisis
  • The Revolution

 

Unit 2: The Revolutionary Period

  • Confederation and Constitution
  • Foundations of American Government
  • Federalists and Republicans
  • The Early Republic

 

Unit 3: Antebellum America

  • The Market Revolution
  • Jacksonian America
  • Abolitionism
  • Slavery and Westward Expansion
  • Texas and Mexico

 

Unit 4: The Civil War Era

  • Secession and War
  • The Civil War: Course
  • The Civil War: Consequences
  • Reconstruction

 

Unit 5: The Gilded Age

  • Industrial America
  • Urbanization
  • The Spanish-American War
  • Progressivism

 

Unit 6: The World and America

  • The Great War and Versailles
  • Laissez-Faire America
  • The Great Depression
  • The New Deal
  • The Second World War: Causes

 

Unit 7: Cold War America

  • The Second World War: Course
  • Cold War: Containment
  • Post-War America
  • The Civil Rights Era
  • The 1960’s
  • Cold War: Détente to Reagan
  • The Age of Terror

 

GENERAL STUDIES

Physics

Course Description:

Physics provides a hands-on experience with the basic principles of physics, as well as
rigorous practice using logical thinking skills. Students use sophisticated computer tools
to gather and analyze data about simple physical phenomena and use their results to
develop various physical laws and to make predictions about additional phenomena.
They then confirm or refute their predictions by experiment. Topics include mechanics,
thermodynamics, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and waves and sound.
Additional emphasis is placed on the development of computer and laboratory skills.

Course Objectives:

Students will be able to:

  • Identify questions and concepts that guide scientific investigations;
  • Design and conduct scientific investigations;
  • Use technology and mathematics to improve investigations and communications;
  • Formulate and revise explanations and models using logic and evidence (critical
    thinking);
  • Recognize and analyze explanations and models; and Communicate and support a scientific argument.

 

Scope and Sequence:

UNIT 1: Motion

  • Graph interpretations
  • Position vs. time
  • Velocity vs. time
  • Acceleration vs. time
  • Problem solving
  • Using graphs (average velocity, instantaneous velocity, acceleration, displacement, change in velocity)
  • Uniform acceleration including free fall (initial velocity, final velocity, time,displacement, acceleration, average velocity)
  • Projectiles
  • Independence of horizontal and vertical motion
  • Problem-solving involving horizontally launched projectiles

 

UNIT 2: Forces, momentum and motion

  • Newton’s laws applied to complex problems
  • Gravitational force and fields
  • Elastic forces
  • Friction force (static and kinetic)
  • Air resistance and drag
  • Forces in two dimensions
  • Adding vector forces
  • Motion down inclines
  • Centripetal forces and circular motion
  • Momentum, impulse and conservation of momentum

 

UNIT 3: Energy

  • Gravitational potential energy
  • Energy in springs
  • Nuclear energy
  • Work and power
  • Conservation of energy

 

UNIT 4: Thermodynamics

  • Heat
  • Temperature
  • Specific heat capacity
  • Heat and work
  • Basic laws of Thermodynamics

 

UNIT 5: Waves

  • Wave properties
  • Conservation of energy
  • Reflection
  • Refraction
  • Interference
  • Diffraction
  • Light phenomena
  • Ray diagrams (propagation of light)
  • Law of reflection (equal angles)
  • Snell’s law
  • Diffraction patterns
  • Wave – particle duality of light
  • Visible spectrum and color

 

UNIT 6: Electricity and magnetism

  • Charging objects (friction, contact and induction)
  • Coulomb’s law
  • Electric fields and electric potential energy
  • DC circuits
  • Ohm’s law
  • Series circuits
  • Parallel circuits
  • Mixed circuits
  • Applying conservation of charge and energy (junction and loop rules)
  • Magnetic fields and energy
  • Electromagnetic interactions

 

GENERAL STUDIES

Algebra 2

Course Description:

This course extends the skills and concepts introduced in Algebra 1 and covers the
following topics: absolute value inequalities; linear, quadratic and absolute value
functions (their graphs and defining features); properties of exponents including
negative, zero and fractional values; systems of linear and quadratic equations and
inequalities; quadratics equations with complex number solutions; exponential and
logarithmic functions (properties, graphs, solving equations and applications);
polynomial functions (graphing, finding zeros and important theorems); square root and
cube root functions; rational functions (graphing, finding zeros, and asymptotes); and
conic sections. Also, since problem solving is an integral part of this course, students
spend a considerable amount of time translating problems presented in written form to
equivalent statements in mathematics. Then, the students find solutions to the
problems and express the results in written form. Algebra 2 is a prerequisite for all
advanced math courses.

Course Objectives:

  • Students will be able to analyze and evaluate the characteristics of step, piece-wise,
    exponential, and quadratic functions, as well as inverses of functions
  • Students will interpret and apply the characteristics of functions with regard to a given
    context and analyze and evaluate rates of change, both constant and variable, within
    the basic function families.
  • Students will be able to analyze and evaluate geometric and arithmetic sequences as
    functions.
  • Students will analyze and solve quadratic equations using a variety of techniques and
    represent, simplify, and operate with complex numbers.
  • Students will be able to analyze and solve problems involving probabilities,
    permutations, and combinations, as well as analyze and evaluate sample data,
    making inferences about population means and standard deviations and using these
    inferences to compare data sets.
  • Students will understand and apply algebraic models to quantify the association
    between two quantitative variables.

 

Scope and Sequence:

Analyzing Equations and Inequalities

  • Expressions, formulas, and properties of real numbers
  • Graphs and measures of central tendency
  • Solving equations and solving absolute value equations
  • Solving inequalities and solving absolute value inequalities

 

Graphing Linear Relations and Functions

  • Relations and functions
  • Linear equations
  • Slope
  • Writing linear equations
  • Scatter plots
  • Special functions
  • Linear inequalities

 

Solving Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities

  • Graphing systems and solving systems algebraically
  • Cramer’s Rule
  • Graphings systems of inequalities
  • Linear programming and applications
  • Systems in three variables

 

Matrices

  • Adding, subtracting, and multiplying matrices
  • Determinants
  • Identity and inverse
  • Using matrices to solve systems of equations
  • Using augmented matrices
  • Box and whisker plots

 

Exploring Polynomials and Radical Expressions

  • Monomials and polynomials
  • Dividing polynomials and factoring
  • Roots of real numbers and radical expressions
  • Rational exponents
  • Solving radical equations and inqualities
  • Complex numbers and simplifying expressions with complex numbers

 

Exploring Quadratic Functions and Inequalities

  • Solving by graphing, factoring, and completing the square
  • Quadratic formula and discriminant
  • Sum and product of roots
  • Analyzing graphs of quadratic functions
  • Graphing and solving quadratic inequalities
  • Standard deviation and the normal distribution

 

Analyzing Conic Sections

  • Parabolas, circles, ellipses, hyperbolas, conic sections
  • Solving quadratic systems

 

Exploring Polynomial Functions

  • Graphing and approximating zeros
  • Roots and zeros
  • Using quadratic techniques to solve
  • Composition of functions
  • Inverse functions and relations

 

Exploring Rational Expressions

  • Graphing Rational Functions
  • Direct, inverse, and joint variation
  • Multiplying, dividing, adding, and subtracting rational expressions
  • Solving rational equations and inequalities

 

Exploring Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

  • Real exponents and exponential functions
  • Logarithms and logarithmic functions
  • Properties of logarithms, common logarithms, natural logarithms
  • Solving exponential equations
  • Growth and decay

 

Investigating Sequences and Series

  • Arithmetic sequences and series
  • Geometric sequences and series
  • Infinite geometric series
  • Recursion and special sequences
  • Fractals and the binomial theorem

 

Investigating Discrete Mathematics and Probability

  • The counting principle
  • Permutations and combinations
  • Probability
  • Multiplying probabilities and adding probabilities

GENERAL STUDIES

Chemistry

Course Description:

This course is a standards-based study of fundamental chemical concepts, such as atomic theory and its relation to chemical behavior, chemical bonding, the mole and stoichiometry, molecular kinetics, energy relationships, solution dynamics, acids-bases, equilibrium, organic and biological chemistry, and nuclear interactions. This course emphasizes problem-solving skills and is designed to 2014-01-09 14.38.09introduce students to both the descriptive and quantitative aspects of chemistry. When possible, new ideas are introduced through experiment or demonstration, with emphasis placed on the interpretation and analysis of data. The course teaches students to understand and apply chemical concepts while gaining an understanding of chemistry’s relationship with current societal issues and everyday life.

2014-01-09 14.13.07Course Objectives:

  • Students will explore the basic building blocks of matter, investigating the quantum structure of atoms, how that structure determines properties and the organization elements on the Periodic Table. They will investigate how atoms interact, bond, and create larger structures with predictable behaviors. Students will investigate basic techniques to quantify various properties and chemical interactions and understand the mathematical means of predicting outcomes of chemical and physical changes. They will also study thermodynamic principles and the mass actions of reaction rates and equilibria that govern chemical processes. Chemistry students also will consider the larger contexts and applications of these concepts, from organic and biochemical to nuclear processes.
  • Students will apply measurement, observation, statistical, and technological skills while investigating chemical concepts. Evidence and experimental data will be analyzed for reliability and possible sources of error. The use of well-designed, memorable laboratory experiences will facilitate this application of scientific knowledge and methodology and is essential in helping students to analyze the content critically. Students will learn how ethical considerations play an important role in modern chemistry-related fields and explore the importance of personal accountability in both individual and group work situations.
  • Students will improve their ability to learn independently by researching and drawing generalizations from science related articles, books, graphs, charts, and diagrams. Regular opportunities are provided for students to clearly communicate their understanding through oral and written explanations of science concepts and laboratory experiences.
  • Students will study the applications of chemistry to develop critical thinking skills.

 

Scope and Sequence:

Introduction to Chemistry

  • What is Chemistry
  • Using the Scientific Approach and Scientific Method

 

Measurements and Calculations

  • Units
  • Length, Volume, and Mass
  • Uncertainty in Measurements and Significant Figures
  • Unit Conversions
  • Density

 

Matter

  • Physical and Chemical Properties and Changes
  • Elements and Compounds
  • Pure Substances and Mixtures
  • Separation of Mixtures

 

Chemical Foundations: Elements, Atoms, and Ions

  • The Elements and Symbols
  • Dalton’s Atomic Theory
  • Formulas and Compounds
  • Structure of an Atom
  • Isotopes
  • Periodic Table
  • Natural States of Elements

 

Nomenclature

  • Naming Compounds
  • Naming Binary Compounds
  • Naming Compounds with Polyatomic Ions
  • Naming Acids
  • Writing Formulas with Names

 

Chemical Reactions

  • Evidence of Chemical Reactions
  • Chemical Equations
  • Balancing Chemical Equations

 

Reactions in Aqueous Solutions

  • Predicting Reactions
  • Reactions in Which a Solid Forms
  • Acid Base Reactions
  • Reactions of Metals and Non-Metals
  • Classifying Reactions

 

Chemical Composition

  • Atomic Masses: Counting Atoms by Weighing
  • The Mole and Molar Mass
  • Percent Compositions and Formulas of Compounds
  • Empirical Formula and Molecular Formula

 

Chemical Quantities

  • Information Given by Chemical Reactions
  • Mole-Mole Relationships and Mass Calculations
  • Limiting Reactants
  • Percent Yield

 

Energy

  • The Nature of Energy
  • Temperature and Heat; Exothermic and Endothermic Processes
  • Thermodynamics and Measuring Changes in Energy
  • Enthalpy – Thermochemistry
  • Hess’ Law
  • Quality vs. Quantity of Energy

 

Modern Atomic Theory

  • Rutherford’s Atom
  • Electromagnetic Radiation and Emission of Energy by Atoms
  • Energy Levels of Hydrogen
  • Bohr Model and Wave Mechanical Model
  • Hydrogen Orbitals and Electron Configurations
  • Atomic Properties of the Periodic Table

 

Chemical Bonding 

  • Types of Chemical Bonds
  • Electronegativity, Bond Polarity, and Diapole Moments
  • Stable Electron Configurations and Charges
  • Ionic Bonding and Ionic Compounds
  • Lewis Structures and Multiple Bonds
  • Molecular Structure and VSEPR Model
  • Molecules with Double Bonds

 

Gases                    

  • Pressure
  • Pressure and Volume: Boyle’s Law
  • Volume and Temperature: Charles’ Law
  • Volume and Moles: Avogadro’s Law
  • The Ideal Gas Law
  • Dalton’s Law of Partial Pressures
  • Kinetic Molecular Theory of Gases
  • Gas Stoichiometry

 

Liquids and Solids   

  • Water and Phase Changes
  • Energy Requirements for Changes of State
  • Inter-Molecular forces, Vapor Pressure, and Evaporation
  • Solid State – types of Solids
  •  Bonding in Solids

 

Solutions

  • Solutions
  • Mass Percent and Molarity
  • Dilution
  • Stoichiometry of Solution Reactions
  • Neutralization Reactions
  • Solution Composition

 

Acids and Bases

  • Acid Strength
  • Water as an Acid and a Base
  • The pH Scale
  • Buffered Solutions

 

Equilibrium

  • How Chemical Reactions Occur and Conditions that Alter Reaction Rates
  • The Equilibrium Condition: a Dynamic Condition
  • The Equilibrium Constant
  • Heterogeneous Equilibrium
  • Le Chatlier’s Principle
  • Solubility Equilibrium

 

Oxidation-Reduction Reactions and Electrochemistry

  • Oxidation States
  • Oxidation-Reduction Between Non-Metals
  • Electrochemistry and Electrolysis

 

Organic Chemistry

  • Carbon Bonding
  • Alkanes
  • Structural Formulas and Isomerism
  • Alkenes and Alkynes
  • Aromatic Hydrocarbons
  • Functional Groups
  • Alcohols, Aldehydes, and Ketones
  • Carboxylic Acids and Esters
  • Polymers

 

Biochemistry

  • Proteins
  • Enzymes
  • Carbohydrates
  • Nucleic Acids
  • Lipids

GENERAL STUDIES

Biology

Course Description:

This course introduces students to the study of the life sciences. The ultimate goal is to produce students who are more scientifically literate and environmentally aware; therefore, the curriculum addresses attitudes, processes, knowledge science, technology, society, the environment, and careers. Topics covered include the nature of science, the structure and function of the cell, chemistry of living organisms, genetics, nucleic acid formation and function, taxonomy, a study of the characteristics of the six kingdoms of organisms, origin and diversity of life, and ecological relationships. Various laboratory investigations and other activities strengthen the mastery of topics covered.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Understanding Organization and Development: Living organisms are composed of cellular units (structures) that carry out functions required for life. Cellular units are composed of molecules, which also carry out biological functions.
  • Understanding Matter and Energy Transformations: Food is required for energy and building cellular materials. Organisms in an ecosystem have different ways of obtaining food, and some organisms obtain their food directly from other organisms. All animals and most plants depend on both other organisms and their environment to meet their basic needs.
  • Understanding Heredity and Reproduction: Organisms reproduce, develop, and have predictable life cycles. Organisms contain genetic information that influences their traits, and they pass this on to their offspring during reproduction.
  • Understanding Evolution and Diversity: Sometimes, differences between organisms of the same kind provide advantages for surviving and reproducing in different environments. These selective differences may lead to dramatic changes in characteristics of organisms in a population over extremely long periods of time.
  • Understanding Science Practices:
    • Understand Scientific Explanations: Students understand core concepts and principles of science and use measurement and observation tools to assist in categorizing, representing, and interpreting the natural and designed world.
    • Generate Scientific Evidence Through Active Investigations: Students master the conceptual, mathematical, physical, and computational tools that need to be applied when constructing and evaluating claims.
    •  Reflect on Scientific Knowledge: Scientific knowledge builds on itself over time.
    • Participate Productively in Science: The growth of scientific knowledge involves critique and communication, which are social practices that are governed by a core set of values and norms.

Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Nightly reading will be given as homework.
  • Periodic written homework will be given as a review of material covered in class.

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.
  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.
  • Labs will be done at least once per unit, and lab reports will count as quiz grades.

Midterm or final: 30%

 

Scope and Sequence:

The Nature of Life

  • The Science of Biology
    • What is science? How do Scientists work?
    •  Tools and Procedures
    • The Chemistry of Life
      • The nature of matter
      • The properties of water
      • Carbon compounds
      • Chemical reactions and enzymes

 

Cells

  • Cell Structure and Function
    • Cell Theory and structure of a cell
    • Plasma membrane and diffusion and osmosis
    • Prokaryotic vs. Eukaryotic
    • Photosynthesis
      • Energy and life
      • Photosynthesis overview and its chemical reactions
      • Cellular Respiration
        • Chemical Pathways
        • Krebs Cycle and Electron Transport
        • Cell Growth and Division and Regulating the Cell Cycle

 

Genetics

  • Introduction to genetics
    • Gregor Mendel
    • Probability and Punnett Squares
    • Mendelian Genetics
    • Meiosis
    • Gene linkage and maps
    • DNA and RNA
    • Genetic engineering
    • The human genome
      • Human heredity
      • Human chromosomes
      • Human molecular genetics

 

Evolution

  • Darwin’s Theory of Evolution
  • Evolution of populations
  • Classifications

 

Microorganisms and Fungi

  • Bacteria and viruses
  • Protists
  • Fungi

 

Plants

  • Diversity
  • Roots, stems and leaves
  • Reproduction
  • Adaptation

 

Invertebrates

  • Sponges and Cnidarians
  • Worms and mollusks
  • Arthropods and echinoderms
  • Comparing invertebrates

 

Chordates

  • Non-vertebrate chordates, fish, and amphibians
  • Reptiles and birds
  • Mammals
  • Comparing chordates
  • Animal behavior

 

The Human Body

  • Nervous system
  • Skeletal, muscular, and integumentary systems
  • Circulatory and respiratory systems
  • Digestive and excretory systems
  • Endocrine and reproductive systems
  • The immune system and disease

GENERAL STUDIES

Pre-calculus

Course Description

In this course emphasis is placed on the many trigonometric, geometric and algebraic techniques needed for the preparation of the study of Calculus. The course takes a functional point of view towards topics and is designed to strengthen and enhance conceptual understanding and mathematical reasoning used when solving problems. The course also emphasizes the use of the graphing calculator as a tool to interpret results as well as a method of obtaining an answer. Mastery of algebraic skills is an essential prerequisite. This course surveys a variety of pre-calculus topics including polynomial, rational, exponential, and trigonometric functions over the real and complex numbers. Much emphasis is placed on theory, and breadth and depth of understanding as well as efficacy. A pupil who successfully completes this course is prepared for Calculus AP/AB.

 

Course Objectives

  • Students will understand the structure of the systems of real and complex numbers, and the concept of functions and their unifying role in mathematics.
  • Students will utilize algebraic and trigonometric concepts and skills, will be able to analyze and graph a variety of functions, and will acquire the necessary skills used in calculus such as evaluating limits and the concept of continuity.
  • Students are expected to apply the following common skills that are relevant across all curriculum areas and career pathways: students will use technology, apply problem solving and critical thinking skills, and adapt to varied roles and responsibilities.
  • Students communicate precisely about quantities, logical relationships, and unknown values through the use of signs, symbols, models, graphs, and mathematical vocabulary. Regular opportunities are provided for students to communicate through oral and written explanations of math concepts.
  • Students learn to apply mathematics to everyday life.

 

Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Nightly homework will be given as a review of what was covered in class

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.
  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

Midterm or final: 30%

 

Scope and Sequence

Linear Relations and Functions

  • Relations and Functions
  • Compositions of Functions
  • Graphing Linear Equations
  • Writing Equations
  • Equations of Parallel and Perpendicular Lines
  • Modeling Real World Data with Linear Functions
  • Absolute Value Functions
  • Graphing Linear Inequalities

 

Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities

  • Solving Systems of Equations in Two and Three Variables
  • Using Matrices to Model Motion and Real World Data
  • Determinants and Multiplicative Inverses of Matrices
  • Solving Systems of Inequalities
  • Linear Programming

 

The Nature of Graphs

  • Symmetry and Coordinate Graphs
  • Families of Graphs
  • Graphs of Nonlinear Inequalities
  • Inverse Functions and Relations
  • Continuity and End Behavior
  • Critical Points and Extrema
  • Graphs of Rational Functions
  • Direct, Indirect, and Joint Variation

 

Polynomial and Rational Functions

  • Polynomial Functions
  • Quadratic Equations
  • The Remainder and Factor Theorems and the Rational Root Theorem
  • Locating Zeros of a Polynomial Function
  • Rational Equations and Partial Fractions
  • Radical Equations and Inequalities
  • Modeling Real World Data with Polynomial Functions

 

The Trigonometric Functions

  • Angles and Degree Measure
  • Trigonometric Ratios in Right Triangles
  • Trigonometric Functions on the Unit Circle
  • Applying Trigonometric Functions
  • Solving Right Triangles
  • The Law of Sines and The Law of Cosines

 

Graphs of Trigonometric Functions

  • Angles and Radian Measure
  • Linear and Angular Velocity
  • Graphing Sine and Cosine Functions
  • Amplitude and Period of Sine and Cosine Functions
  • Horizontal and Vertical Shifts of Sine and Cosine Functions
  • Modeling Real World Data with Sinusoidal Functions
  • Graphing Other Trigonometric Functions and their Inverses

 

Trigonometric Identities and Equations

  • Basic Trigonometric Identities
  • Verifying Trigonometric Identities
  • Sum and Difference Identities and Double Angle and Half Angle Identities
  • Solving Trigonometric Equations
  • Normal Form of a Linear Equation
  • Distance From a Point to a Line

 

Vectors and Parametric Equations

  • Geometric and Algebraic Vectors
  • Vectors in Three Dimensional Space
  • Perpendicular Vectors
  • Applications with Vectors
  • Vectors and Parametric Equations
  • Modeling Motion Using Parametric Equations
  • Transformational Matrices in Three Dimensional Space

 

Polar Coordinates and Complex Numbers

  • Polar Coordinates
  • Graphs of Polar Equations
  • Polar and Rectangular Coordinates
  • Polar Form of a Linear Equation
  • Simplifying Complex Numbers
  • The Complex Plan and Polar Form of Complex Numbers
  • Products and Quotients of Complex Numbers in Polar Form
  • Powers and Roots of Complex Numbers

 

Conics

  • Introduction to Analytic Geometry
  • Circles, Ellipses, Hyperbolas, and Parabolas
  • Rectangular and Parametric Forms of Conic Sections
  • Transformation of Conics
  • Systems of Second Degree Equations and Inequalities

 

Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

  • Real Exponents
  • Exponential Functions
  • The Number e
  • Logarithmic Functions
  • Common Logarithms and Natural Logarithms
  • Modeling Real World Data with Exponential and Logarithmic Functions

 

Sequences and Series

  • Arithmetic and Geometric Sequences and Series
  • Infinite Sequences and Series
  • Convergent and Divergent Series
  • Sigma Notation and the nth Term
  • The Binomial Theorem
  • Special Sequences and Series
  • Sequences and Iterations
  • Mathematical Induction

 

Combinatorics and Probability

  • Permutations and Combinations
  • Permutations with Repetitions and Circular Permutations
  • Probability and Odds and Probabilities of Compound Events
  • Conditional Probabilities
  • The Binomial Theorem and Probabilities

 

Statistics and Data Analysis

  • The Frequency Distribution
  • Measures of Central Tendency
  • Measures of Variability
  • The Normal Distribution
  • Sample Sets of Data

GENERAL STUDIES

Algebra

Course Description:

Students will explore a variety of methods to solve equations, graph functions, use mathematical symbols to represent aspects of the physical world, and learn to communicate effectively using mathematical notation. The course covers the following topics: basic operations on polynomial expressions, solutions to linear and quadratic equations, linear functions (graphing, the slope and y-intercepts of lines, writing the equations of lines), systems of linear equations and inequalities, quadratic and exponential functions (graphing and their properties), properties of exponents, properties of rational and irrational numbers, and simplification of radical expressions. Also, since problem solving is an integral part of this course, students spend a considerable amount of time translating problems presented in written form to equivalent statements in mathematics. Then, the students find solutions to the problems and express the results in written form.

 

Course Objectives:

  • Students will translate, evaluate and simplify expressions, order of operation; Words to symbols and graph on a coordinate plane: ordered pairs, linear equations, linear inequalities, relations and functions.
  • Students will solve equations and inequalities involving angle measures.
  • Students will classify numbers into their appropriate systems.
  • Students will calculate the probability and odds of a simple event using the results to predict the outcome of future events, and differentiate between odds and probability of a simple event.
  • Students will recognize, analyze and extend patterns and recognize and use properties of Algebra.
  • Students will formulate a linear equation or inequality given a word problem and vice versa.
  • Students will determine if a relation is a function and evaluate a function for a given value and will identify the domain, range, and inverse of a relation showing the relation as sets of ordered pairs, tables, mappings and graphs.
  • Students will perform the four basic operations on rational numbers.
  • Students will determine the slope of a line given two points, a linear equation or a graph.
  • Students will compare and order real numbers including square roots.
  • Students will solve and graph compound inequalities.
  • Students will determine the x and y intercepts of linear graphs from their equations and will solve linear equations and inequalities and graph solutions on a number line.
  • Students will classify polynomials and determine the degree for any polynomial.
  • Students will solve quadratic equations by factoring.
  • Students will solve rational equations and identify and solve proportions using them in applications.
  • Students will simplify polynomials using appropriate exponent rules and give answers in either descending or ascending order of exponents.
  • Students will multiply polynomials using FOIL on the distributing property and appropriate exponent rules and give answers in either descending or ascending order of exponents.
  • Students will factor out the GCF of a polynomial and factor polynomials completely using difference of two squares, perfect square trinomials, trial and error, or regrouping.
  • Students will simplify rational expressions using the four basic operations and determine the undefined values.

 

Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Nightly homework will be given as a review of what was covered in class

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.
  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

Midterm or final: 30%

 

Scope and Sequence:

 

Exploring Expressions, Equations, and Functions

  • Variables and Patterns
  • Order of Operations
  • Properties
    • Identity and Equality
    • Distributive
    • Associative and Commutative

 

Exploring Rational Numbers

  • Integers and Number Line
  • Rational Numbers
    • Adding/Subtracting
    • Multiplying/Dividing
    • Square Roots and Real Numbers

 

Solving Linear Equations

  • With Addition/Subtraction
  • With Multiplication/Division
  • Multi-Step Equations and with Variables on Both Sides
  • Formulas

 

Proportional Reasoning

  • Ratios and Proportions
  • Percent and Percent Change
  • Probability and Odds
  • Direct and Inverse Variation

 

Graphing Relations and Functions

  • The Coordinate Plane
    • Relations and Functions
    • Graphing Linear Equations
    • Writing Equations from Patterns

 

Analyzing Linear Equations

  • Slope
  • Writing Linear Equations
    • Point Slope and Standard Form
    • Slope Intercept From
    • Graphing Linear Equations
      • Midpoints
      • Perpendicular and Parallel Lines

 

Solving Linear Inequalities

  • With Addition/Subtraction
  • With Multiplication/Division
  • Multi-Step
  • Compound Inqualities
  • Absolute Value
  • Graphing Inequalities with Two Variables

 

Solving Systems of Linear Equations and Inequalities

  • Using Graphing
  • Using Substitution
  • With Elimination Using Addition/Subtraction and Multiplication
  • Graphing Systems of Inequalities

 

Exploring Polynomials

  • Multiplying and Dividing Monomials
  • Scientific Notation
  • Polynomials
    • Addition/Subtraction
    • Multiplying by a Monomial
    • Multiplying by another Polynomial
    • Special Products

 

Using Factoring

  • GCF and Distributive Property
  • Factoring Trinomials
  • Difference of Squares and Perfect Squares
  • Solving Equations by Factoring

 

Exploring Quadratic and Exponential Functions

  • Graphing Quadratic Functions
  • Solving Quadratics by Graphing
  • The Quadratic Formula
  • Exponential Functions and Growth and Decay

 

Exploring Rational Expressions and Equations

  • Simplifying
  • Multiplying/Dividing
  • Dividing Polynomials
  • Rational Expressions with Like and Unlike Denominators
  • Mixed Expressions and Complex Fractions
  • Solving Rational Equations

 

Exploring Radical Expressions and Equations

  • Simplifying
  • Operations with Radical Expressions
  • Radical Equations
  • Completing the Square

GENERAL STUDIES

Economics

Course Description:

The general objective of this course is for students to master fundamental economic concepts, appreciate how the principal concepts of economics relate to each other and understand the structure of economic systems. Students will use economic concepts in a reasoned, careful manner in dealing with personal, community, national and global economic issues. They will use measurement concepts and methods such as tables, charts, graphs, ratios, percentages and index numbers to understand and interpret relevant data. They should learn to make reasoned decisions on economic issues as citizens, workers, consumers, business owners, managers and members of civic groups.

Course Objectives:

  • Students understand common economic terms and concepts and economic reasoning.
  • Students analyze the elements of the United States market economy in a global setting.
  • Students analyze the influence of the U.S. government on the American economy.
  • Students analyze the elements of the United State labor market in a global setting.
  • Students analyze the aggregate economic behavior of the U.S. economy.
  • Students analyze issues of international trade, and explain how the U.S. economy affects, and is affected by, economic forces beyond its borders.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of income and spending issues facing individuals and businesses.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of how banks and other financial institutions operate.
  • Students will demonstrate an understanding of effective investment practices.
  • Students will analyze the role and importance of credit in personal and business finance.

 

Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Nightly reading will be given as homework.
  • Periodic written homework will be given as a review of material covered in class.
  • Writing assignments and/or projects will be given quarterly.

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.
  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

 

Midterm or final: 30%

 

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Introduction to Economics

  • What is Economics?
  • Economic Systems
  • American Free Enterprise

 

Unit 2: Introduction to Microeconomics: How Markets Work

  • Demand and Supply
  • Prices
  • Market Structures

 

Unit 3: Business and Labor

  • Business Organizations
  • Labor

 

Unit 4: Money, Banking, and Finance

  • Money and Banking
  • Financial Markets

 

Unit 5: Introduction to Macroeconomics: Measuring Economic Performance

  • Gross Domestic Product and Growth
  • Economic Challenges

 

Unit 6: Government and the Economy

  • Taxes and Government Spending
  • Fiscal Policy
  • The Federal Reserve and Monetary Policy

 

Unit 7: The Global Economy

  • International Trade
  • Economic Development and Transition

 

Unit 8: Financial Literacy

  • Planning and goals
  • Career preparation
  • Spending and credit
  • Consumer protection
  • Income
  • Money management
  • Saving and investing
  • Risk management