JUDAIC STUDIES

JUDAIC STUDIES

The extensive reach of our Judaic Curriculum has been developed with deeper mission in mind. With the Torah each student learns, we wish to instill within her a love and reverence of G-d and Judiasm that will stand at the core of her developing adult identity. Our students are the next generation of Jewish women, and the continuity of the Jewish people rests in their hands. It is not enough for them to master the comprehensive curriculum; it must be incorporated into the very lives and essence of every student.2013-11-18 11.38.52

Torah is internalized through study and dedication. All students take between three and four years of Chumash (Be’iyun and Bekius), studying texts in both the original Hebrew and in translation. Our Chumash courses are designed to develop the students’ textual skills, with the goal of enabling the students to read and comprehend the text of Tanach and its commentaries with ease. We work to achieve a depth of understanding of the text that allows the students to use the text as a springboard for evaluation, analysis, and synthesis of ideas. Our Chumash Bekiyus classes give the girls a sense of the scope and major philosophical themes of each sefer.

Both our Chumash Be’iyun classes and our Ivrit Classes are tracked to allow for the homogeneity that assists in rapid skill development.

Equally important are classes that are rich in Torah life approach, Jewish philosophy, and Torah thought. It is crucial to us that students are given a powerful hashkafic grounding so they can begin their adult lives well-informed, well-educated, and confident in their beliefs.

The four years of Navi are taught through a Mussar paradigm, where relevant life lessons are culled from the text and storyline.  We require four years of Halacha, with a focus on the laws necessary for Jewish living and running a Jewish home. We also offer three years of Ivrit classes to learn how to speak, write and understand Modern Hebrew. Our curriculum is rounded out with classes in Tefillah, Parsha, Yahadus, and Jewish Philosophy.

JUDAIC STUDIES

ספר במדבר: The Book of Numbers – Track A

TEXTS:

  • Sefer Bamidbar – Hebrew with commentaries for classroom use.
  • Sefer Bamidbar – Metzudah for out of class use.
  • Supplements are provided by teacher containing Midrashim, Acharonim, Gemara, and Halacha that are pertinent to subject matter.

Course Description:

This Bible study course is track based to allow for appropriate and focused skill development. It allows for an in depth study of the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers. Emphasis is on mastery of content, focusing mainly on the text, Rashi, and a sampling of early and later commentaries. Textual skills begin to be developed through a variety of learning strategies.

Course Objectives:

      • Gain a command of loshon hakodesh and a profound appreciation of G-d’s Torah and our classic interpreters of the texts.
      • Learn middos development and moral and ethical standards as portrayed in the lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and other Biblical personalities.
      • Use the text as a spark to explore the philosophical concepts contained therein and expand the scope and depth of their understanding of תורה השקפה.
      • Become comfortable and self-sufficient reading Biblical text, including the ability to:
              • develop reading fluency and speed in both print and rashi script.
              • expand their vocabulary and understanding of Biblical Hebrew
              • comprehend root words and be able to recognize and translate different conjugations of root words.
              • break down and translate a פםוק.
              • develop proficiency reading commentaries including the ability to:
                      • identify the question, answer, and supporting evidence from within a commentary.
                      • bridge the commentary back into the text to enhance understanding.
                      • compare and contrast different commentaries

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Bamidbar

  • Uniqueness of Shevet Levi
  • Moshe’s talmidim
  • Numbering the Sons of Levi
  • Bad Neighbors/Good Neighbors

 

Unit 2: Naso

  • Sotah
  • Birkas Kohanim

 

Unit 3: Behaaloscha

  • Chovav and the Aron’s Travels
  • The Complainers
  • Kivros Hata’ava
  • Loshon Hora about Moshe

 

Unit 4: Korach

  • The uprising and Related Topics

 

Unit 5: Chukas

  • Miriam;s Death and Mai Meriva
  • Aharon’s Death
  • Copper Snake

 

Unit 6: Balak

  • Bilam and Balak
  • Sin in Shitim

Assessments

  • Students will be tested with a written assessment approximately twice a month on the content they have learned.
  • Students will be quizzed daily with translation review assessments
  • Students will have oral midterm and final. It will be a skill based review of key commentaries learned throughout the semester.

JUDAIC STUDIES

ספר במדבר: The Book of Numbers – Track B

TEXTS:

  • Sefer Bamidbar – Hebrew with commentaries for classroom use.
  • Sefer Bamidbar – Metzudah for out of class use.
  • Suppliments are provided by teacher containing Midrashim, Acharonim, Gemara, and Halacha that are pertinent to subject matter.

Course Description:

This Bible study course is track based to allow for appropriate and focused skill development. It allows for an in depth study of the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers. Emphasis is on mastery of content, focusing mainly on the text, Rashi, and a sampling of early and later commentaries, but depth of analysis is increased. This level delves into more interpretations of text and Rashi than Track A, and there is an expectation of mastery appropriate for a level 2 course. Goals are advanced proficiency in all commentaries to prepare students for intensive seminary studies.

Course Objectives:

  • Gain a command of loshon hakodesh and a profound appreciation of G-d’s Torah and our classic interpreters of the texts.
  • Learn middos development and moral and ethical standards as portrayed in the lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and other Biblical personalities.
  • Use the text as a spark to explore the philosophical concepts contained therein and expand the scope and depth of their understanding of תורה השקפה.
  • Become comfortable and self-sufficient reading Biblical text, including the ability to:
    • develop reading fluency and speed in both print and rashi script.
    • expand their vocabulary and understanding of Biblical Hebrew
    • comprehend root words and be able to recognize and translate different conjugations of root words.
    • break down and translate a פםוק.
    • develop proficiency reading commentaries including the ability to:
      • identify the question, answer, and supporting evidence from within a commentary.
      • bridge the commentary back into the text to enhance understanding.
      • compare and contrast different commentaries

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Bamidbar

  • Uniqueness of Shevet Levi
  • Moshe’s talmidim
  • Numbering the Sons of Levi
  • Bad Neighbors/Good Neighbors

 

Unit 2: Naso

  • Sotah
  • Birkas Kohanim

 

Unit 3: Behaaloscha

  • Chovav and the Aron’s Travels
  • The Complainers
  • Kivros Hata’ava
  • Loshon Hora about Moshe

 

Unit 4: Korach

  • The uprising and Related Topics

 

Unit 5: Chukas

  • Miriam;s Death and Mai Meriva
  • Aharon’s Death
  • Copper Snake

 

Unit 6: Balak

  • Bilam and Balak
  • Sin in Shitim

Assessments

  • Students will be tested with a written assessment approximately twice a month on the content they have learned.
  • Students will be quizzed daily with translation review assessments
  • Students will have oral midterm and final. It will be a skill based review of key commentaries learned throughout the semester.

JUDAIC STUDIES

ספר במדבר: The Book of Numbers – Track C – Honors

TEXTS:

  • Sefer Bamidbar – Hebrew with commentaries for classroom use.
  • Sefer Bamidbar – Metzudah for out of class use.
  • Suppliments are provided by teacher containing Midrashim, Acharonim, Gemara, and Halacha that are pertinent to subject matter.

Course Description:

This Bible study course is track based to allow for appropriate and focused skill development. It allows for an in depth study of the fourth book of the Torah, the Book of Numbers. This is the most advanced Chumash class offered at Atara. Students are exposed to complex insights, interpretations, references to passages in both written and oral Torah, and a wide range of early and later commentaries. The goals are profound comprehension of the philosophy and message of the sections of Bamidbar plus proficiency in texts and commentators. Students are prepared for the most prestigious of seminaries in the United States and abroad.

Course Objectives:

  • Gain a command of loshon hakodesh and a profound appreciation of G-d’s Torah and our classic interpreters of the texts.
  • Learn middos development and moral and ethical standards as portrayed in the lives of the Patriarchs, Matriarchs, and other Biblical personalities.
  • Use the text as a spark to explore the philosophical concepts contained therein and expand the scope and depth of their understanding of תורה השקפה.
  • Become comfortable and self-sufficient reading Biblical text, including the ability to:
    • develop reading fluency and speed in both print and rashi script.
    • expand their vocabulary and understanding of Biblical Hebrew
    • comprehend root words and be able to recognize and translate different conjugations of root words.
    • break down and translate a פםוק.
    • develop proficiency reading commentaries including the ability to:
      • identify the question, answer, and supporting evidence from within a commentary.
      • bridge the commentary back into the text to enhance understanding.
      • compare and contrast different commentaries

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Bamidbar

  • Uniqueness of Shevet Levi
  • Moshe’s talmidim
  • Numbering the Sons of Levi
  • Bad Neighbors/Good Neighbors

 

Unit 2: Naso

  • Sotah
  • Birkas Kohanim

 

Unit 3: Behaaloscha

  • Chovav and the Aron’s Travels
  • The Complainers
  • Kivros Hata’ava
  • Loshon Hora about Moshe

 

Unit 4: Korach

  • The uprising and Related Topics

 

Unit 5: Chukas

  • Miriam;s Death and Mai Meriva
  • Aharon’s Death
  • Copper Snake

 

Unit 6: Balak

  • Bilam and Balak
  • Sin in Shitim

Assessments

  • Students will be tested with a written assessment approximately twice a month on the content they have learned.
  • Students will be quizzed daily with translation review assessments
  • Students will have oral midterm and final. It will be a skill based review of key commentaries learned throughout the semester.

JUDAIC STUDIES

HEBREW LANGUAGE I

 Course Description

The focus of the Hebrew Language sequence is to stress the dual components of grammar and literature. This course concentrates on the development of a working vocabulary in conversational Hebrew. The verb and its conjugation, sentence development and composition are all stressed. Extensive reading and writing both in and out of class are necessary components of this course. Complex verb forms are stressed in grammar. Conversational Hebrew and Israeli publications are utilized throughout the program. This sequence promotes a love for the Hebrew language and to impart skills in conversation, reading and writing. Each succeeding course is designed to build upon the students’ previous knowledge.

Course Objectives

Students who completed this level will be able to:

Speak:

  • in dialogues about school, family, entertainment, personal preference, the weather, or place description – 15 sentences per speaker
  • in an interview: ask questions, answer, report – 15 sentences per speaker
  • express an opinion and support the opinion with reasons – 5-6 sentences

Write:

  • short notes (greeting, apology, thanks, invitation)
  • a personal letter -15 sentences
  • an impersonal letter (announcement, request, report) -10 sentences

Read and comprehend:

  • an informative paragraph -15-20 sentences
  • an opinion supported by reasons
  • a short story – 15-30 sentences
  • a simple poem, or a few biblical verses

Listen to and understand:

  • a short dialogue about daily life – up to 24 sentences
  • a simple song
  • a short informative lecture about modern life, tradition and habits

Recognize and use the following structures: 

  1. Morphology:
    • Past tense of the following verb patterns: pa’al, pi’el, hiph’il, hitpa’el (shlemim);(in pa’al)
    • Declension of the prepositions et, im, shel
    • Prefixes and suffixes of the future tense
    • Recognition of regular verbs (shlemim) in all seven verb patterns (binyanim)
  2. Syntax:
    • Agreement of nouns and adjectives in number and gender and agreement using the definite article
    • Three forms of nominal clauses in all three tenses
    • Impersonal verbal clauses
    • Impersonal nominal clauses
    • Two kinds of object clauses: with the conjunction sh’ and with interrogative adverbs
    • Modals
    • Identifying parts of speech and word order

Scope and Sequence

The following vocabulary units will be taught and integrated into the above course objectives:

Unit 1: Household

Unit 2: School

Unit 3: Grocery

Unit 4: Clothing/Shopping

 Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Frequent nightly readings and written assignments

  • One large project per unit

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.

  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

  • Oral discussion labs once per week

Midterm or final: 30%

 

 

JUDAIC STUDIES

HEBREW LANGUAGE II

 Course Description:

The focus of the Hebrew Language sequence is to stress the dual components of grammar and literature. This course concentrates on the development of a working vocabulary in conversational Hebrew. The verb and its conjugation, sentence development, and composition are all stressed. Extensive reading and writing both in and out of class are necessary components of this course. Complex verb forms are stressed in grammar. Conversational Hebrew and Israeli publications are utilized throughout the program. This sequence promotes a love for the Hebrew language and to impart skills in conversation, reading and writing. Each succeeding course is designed to build upon the students’ previous knowledge.

Course Objectives

Students who completed this level will be able to:

Speak:

  • in conversation on any topic – 20 sentences per speaker

Read: 

  • press releases and articles in journalistic style in elementary Hebrew of 30-35 sentences
  • a short story partially adapted to elementary Hebrew of 70 – 100 sentences
  • poetry, midrashim, or biblical verses, with  general comprehension, based on key words, syntactic structures, and morphology

Write:

  • creating tables from text
  • a personal or historic chronological report ~ 15 sentences
  • a theoretical analysis of reasons, results, and purposes of ~ 2- sentences

Listen to and understand:

  • simple TV or radio news (general understanding)
  • a dialogue in standard Hebrew with ~ 25 sentences per speaker
  • the main ideas of a  simple song based on a single hearing

Recognize and use the following structures: 

  1. Morphology:
    • Normal formation of gerunds in the active conjugations and in the common paradigms: several irregular formations of gerunds
    • Future tense in the conjugations pa’al, pi’el, hiph’il, hipa’el (shlemim); (in pa’al)
    • Common paradigms in the active conjugations
    • Declension of all prepositions with plural noun suffixes (el, al)
    • Declension of all prepositions with singular noun suffixes (etzel, bishvil, l’yad)
    • Declension of prepositins with irregular suffixes (beyn, m’)
    • Past participles of pa’al (shlemim and)
    • Common Hebrew suffixes and patterns of non-Hebrew words
    • The possessive
  2. Syntax:
    • Placement of construct-states (smichut) in sentences
    • Placement of gerunds in sentences
    • Formation of expressions and clauses of cause, time, purpose, result, comparison, contrast, concession
    • Actual conditional clauses
    • Copulas

Scope and Sequence

The following vocabulary units will be taught and integrated into the above course objectives:

Unit 1: Review of concepts covered in Hebrew Language I

Unit 2: Restaurant and food preparation

Unit 3: Shabbos and Holidays

Unit 4: Bank, money, and financial terminology

 Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Frequent nightly readings and written assignments

  • One large project per unit

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.

  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

  • Oral discussion labs once per week

Midterm or final: 30%

JUDAIC STUDIES

The Weekly Parsha

Course Description:

This class will feature an overview of each week’s Torah portion. The overview will present the themes and major points as they are divided by the seven Aliyos. Additionally, specific insights will be discussed, with a focus on ideas that lend themselves to practical application in the day to day lives of the students

Course Objectives:

Students will become familiar with the general content of each week’s Torah portion and acquire insights that will add meaning ot these ideas. Together, they will help the students develop an appreciation and feel for the annual cycle of the reading of the Torah and its connection to the flow of the Jewish year and our daily lives. Students will come to class knowing the number of verses and mitzohs in the current week’s portion as well as the date in the Hebrew Calendar.

 

Assessments:

There will be a weekly quiz on the previous week’s class and a general review and test each quarter.

Scope and Sequence:

Unit 1: Devarim

  • Week 1 – Ha’azinu
  • Week 2 – Vizos HaBracha

 

Unit 2: Braishis

  • Braishis
  • Noach
  • Lech Licha
  • Vayeira
  • Chayei Sara
  • Toldos
  • Vayetzei
  • Vayishlach
  • Vayeishev
  • Mikaitz
  • Vayigash
  • Vayechi

 

Unit 3: Shemos

  • Shemos
  • Vaera
  • Bo
  • Beshalach
  • Yisro
  • Mispatim
  • Teruma
  • Tetzaveh
  • Ki Sisa
  • Vayakhel
  • Pikudei

 

Unit 4: Vayikra

  • Vayikra
  • Tzav
  • Shemini
  • Tazriah
  • Metzorah
  • Acharei Mos
  • Kedoshim
  • Emor
  • Behar
  • Bechukosai

 

Unit 5: Bamidbar

  • Bemidbar
  • Naso
  • Behaloscha
  • Selach

JUDAIC STUDIES

Judaic Art

Course Description

This Judaic Art course is an opportunity for students to work with many different media. The topics covered include instruction in the fundamentals of painting, drawing, and calligraphy. Each student’s creativity and expression are encouraged in a supportive and confidence boosting environment. The goal of the course is to teach the traditional principles of art within a Judaic art framework. The curriculum is focused on the use of color, proportion, technique, and imagery to create works of art that have emotional undertones. Thoughts and ideas are represented through illustration and design.

Course Objectives

Students should be able to:

  • select and use art media, subject matter, and symbols for expression and communication;

  • know the elements of art and the principles of design and how they are used in the visual arts;

  • solve visual arts problems with originality, flexibility, fluency, and imagination;

  • use materials, methods, information, and technology in a safe and ethical manner;

  • perceive, reflect upon, and evaluate the characteristics, purposes, and merits of their work and the work of others;

  • identify, analyze, and apply criteria for making visual aesthetic judgments;

  • understand and execute a project that allows them to take an emotional or non-tangible idea and bring it to a visual form;

  • learn to self-critique and peer-critique art in a supportive environment;

  • learn to accept challenges, discover new art concepts and allow themselves to be stretched beyond their natural comfort zone;

  • appreciate the reality that to get more impressive and creative results, trial and error and patience are essential components;

  • understand the importance of negative and positive space within a design and be able to use and adjust their ideas accordingly;

  • learn about proper layout and correct margins within a design;

  • understand theory related to using color;

  • understand how to use the color wheel to complement their art as well as convey depth and distance based on shade and tints;

 

Scope and Sequence

  1. Micrography- learn the techniques of micrography art and be able to manipulate this art form to create texture and depth within their drawings

    1. What is it?

    2. How is it done?

      1. Rose tutorial

    3. What potential does it have?

      1. “hi” visual

      2. Negative/positive space

      3. Leaf drawings filled

  2. Creating a design

    1. What is your message

    2. What is implied

    3. What is important

      1. Create brainstormed word list

        1. Translation

        2. Association

  3. Harry Chaplin – Flowers Are Red

    1. Realistic vs. imaginary

    2. No limitations

  4. Art Psychology: Beyond Three

    1. More difficult

    2. More creative thinking process

    3. Create 4 sketches

      1. Sketch vs. drawing

  5. Choose your design

    1. Create 4 representations in sketch form

    2. Draw realistic elements

    3. Copy and paste four full size options

      1. Hang on wall

      2. Compare from distance and combine best aspects into final layout

  6. Layout

    1. Standard size/economic options for framing

    2. Building size to include proper margins

      1. Understanding the eye needs space

      2. Where to create spaces

  7. Parts of one whole

    1. Create each image independently

    2. Experiment with fill vs. no fill

    3. Create natural texture

    4. Mix and match variations

      1. Create master template

      2. Use guide underneath

      3. Use reference

  8. Micrography Tips

    1. Cut out/ guide for following

    2. Size matters

    3. Extensions and spacing

  9. Color!

    1. Pastel color wheel

    2. Pastel techniques

      1. Hand/tissue/towel

      2. Broad, tip, corner

      3. Radial

  10. Calligraphy

    1. Use of traditional ink and nibs to create calligraphic Hebrew letters and designs

    2. Fundamentals of ink properties, proper care pressure, and cleaning procedure

    3. Basics of one Hebrew font

    4. How to align letters within texts

    5. Adjust kerning and leading within hand formed letters

    6. Some “safris” rules and guidelines

    7. “point counting” between words and lines to create personalized artwork

 

Projects

Project 1:

Students will learn to create proper blocked text in a standard size and color

Project 2:

Students will learn to arch and stretch letters within circular designs

Students will learn to blend color and pattern within their letters and designs

Students will learn to use ink and color for illumination

Project 3:

Students will create a final piece of artwork that incorporates all of their skills. This project will be the culmination of all elements learned throughout the year. Students will be asked to select one paragraph and illuminate using any or all components of micrography and calligraphy, via size and color effects and  layout and design to create a personalized piece of Judaica art.

 

Judaic Studies

BEKIYUS-BAMIDBAR

Course Description

A Chumash Bikiyus course has been adopted by many of the preeminent girls high schools across the country as a complement to the Chumah Be’iyun course. This course offers the students a broader philosophical perspective, and provides the girls with a more expansive understanding of the timeline and chronology of the Chumash. The primary focus of the course is the key elements of the Book of Bamidbar. Several classes are dedicated to learning about Rosh Hashana and Yom Kippur with each including enhanced appreciation of their precise positions on the Jewish calendar.

 

Course Objectives

  • Students will learn the major events, key personalities, and Ma’amarei Chazal from Bamidbar

  • Students will apply these significant lessons to their lives

  • Students will recognize the relevance of each book to their generation and recognize the eternal message of the sefer

  • Students will know key Ma’amarei Chazal

  • Students must review notes consistently

 

Scope and Sequence

Unit 1- Names of the Sefer and the meanings and messages of each name

  • Bamidbar

  • Chumash Hapikudim

Unit 2-

  • Counting Shevet Levi

  • Degalim

  • Nazir

Unit 3-

  • Birchas Kohanim

  • Pesach Sheini

  • Yisro- the rest of the story

Unit 4-

  • Miriam’s complaint against Moshe

  • Misonenim

  • Korach

Unit 5-

  • Moshe’s “failure”

  • Bilaam

  • Pinchas

Unit 6-

  • Kashering

  • Tevilas Keilim

  • Bnos Tzelafchad

  • Ir Miklat

Unit 7-

  • Authenticity of the Torah record

  • Brochoh

  • Prophecy

Unit 8-

  • Authority of Leadership

  • Humanity of Leadership

  • Land of Israel

  • Zealotry

Included in what is addressed while analyzing each theme will be:

  • Timing

  • Context

  • Characters and their backgrounds

  • Impact on the characters

  • Impact on the “klal”

  • Impact on our destiny

 

Assessments

Students will be assessed through a combination of factors

  • Class participation

  • Frequent quizzes

  • Projects

  • Homework assignments

  • Quarterly Tests

Judaic Studies

 

Jewish Philosophy

 

Text:

Orchos Tzaddikim, The Ways of the Righteous

 

Course Description:

Jewish Philosophy class meets once per week. Its main purpose is to awaken an awareness of self-improvement in students, and to instill a striving within each student to work on one’s middos, character traits. The sefer Orchos Tzaddikim, The Ways of the Righteous, is used as a tool to highlight certain character traits, while the rest will be summarized outside of the text. It is split into 28 chapters. Certain key paragraphs of each chapter will be read in the text. The students will take notes as well as discuss the various points. Each chapter focuses entirely on one middah.

 

Course Objectives:

  • To awaken an awareness of self-improvement in students

  • To instill a striving within each student to work on her middos

  • To serve as a forum in which each student will feel comfortable expressing herself and listening to her peers

  • To use the text as a springboard for many meaningful discussions in which many important religious ethics questions will be answered

Scope and Sequence:

  • Chapter 1:  Shaar HaGa’ava/ Haughtiness

  1. Good pride vs. bad pride

  2. Confidence vs. arrogance

  3. What ga’ava leads to

  4. How to uproot ga’ava

 

  • Chapter 2:  Shaar Ha’anava/Humbleness

  1. 7 ways to recognize a humble person

  2. A humble person’s relationship with Hashem

  3. What anava leads to

  4. People in Tanach who displayed anava

 

  • Chapter 3:  Shaar Habusha/Shame

  1. 4 levels of Busha in regard to sinning

  2. Feeling shame after sinning

  3. Abusing busha; embarrassing someone

  4. Good shame vs. bad shame

  • Chapter 4:  Shaar Ha’azus/Impudence

  1. What azus leads to

  2. How Hashem views & judges an “az panim”

  3. When to use azus for the good

 

  • Chapter 5:  Shaar Ha’ahava/Love

  1. Highest level in serving Hashem

  2. 6 types of corrupt love

  3. Mitzvah of Loving fellow Jew

  4. People in Tanach who displayed ahavas Hashem

  5. Shir HaShirim as a mashal

  • Chapter 6:  Shaar Ha’sinah/Hatred

  1. What sinah causes

  2. Sinas chinam: baseless hatred

  3. 2 types of sinah

  4. People in Tanach who displayed sinah

  5. Mitzvah to hate sheker/falsehood

 

Assessments:

Attendance and participation: 15%

Assignments and homework: 25%

  • Nightly reading will be given as homework.

  • Periodic written homework will be given as a review of material covered in class.

  • Writing assignments will be given quarterly.

Tests and quizzes: 30%

  • Quizzes will be given half way through each unit.

  • Tests will be given at the end of each unit.

 

Midterm or final: 30%

Pacing

The entire Sefer Orchos Tzadikim will be learned with the following timeline:

Sept- Oct: the first 4 chapters (Conceit, Humbleness, Shame, Impudence)

Nov- Dec: the next 6 chapters (Love, Hatred, Mercy, Cruelty, Happiness, Worry)

Jan: 3 chapters (Regret, Anger, Desire)

Feb-March: the next 7 chapters (Jealousy, Alacrity, Laziness, Generosity, Stinginess, Memory, Forgetting)

April –May: the next 6 chapters (Silence, Lies, Truth, Flattery, Slander, and Repentance)

June: the final 2 chapters (Torah, Fear of Heaven)